Tuesday, 1 December 2015

Central Locking Passenger Side Replacement

This is a replacement of the passenger side central locking mechanism.

This is the motor mechanism controlling the locking.

I went the a vehicle scrap shop today to look for the central locking for my left door which was faulty.

Of course, I tested the wiring with multimeter prior to this. This isolated the problem to the motor only. The wires were still delivering the electricity to trigger, only the motor was faulty.


The central left locking mechanism was purchased.
The locking button cable was found to be faulty later on while installing, but it can be easily transplanted from the faulty unit.

The personnel from the scrap shop tested the unit to be working :)


Before installing I needed another tool which i purchased from a hardware shop for $8.50.
A made in Taiwan impact (Screw) driver. This is to open the 3 countersunk screws at the side.


The plastic door framing can be easily pried open using a flat head screw driver.

To release the plastic framing, there are 2 screws at the inside door (pull to open) handle and another screw at the recessed area below it. Simply lift the plastic flap to reveal the screw.

Then proceed to pry open with a flat head screw driver.

The vehicle was resprayed before, so the plastic and glue were not in good condition. I taped it up to prevent water from seeping through.

This is the plastic frame. 
The plastic frame has a power window switch socket. It has to be removed to release the frame for easier work access.

The top cable is my original. The bottom is the replacement unit. It looks shorter so i cannot use it. It seemed broken to be honest.
 Unplug the power supply to the central locking mechanism. There is another steel hinge inside which you can free it by simply pushing it down. This is for usage of the door handle outside the door.


Undo the three countersunk screws with an impact (Screw) driver. Then undo the screw near the plug.

Then try to manoeuvre it out because it sits in an L shaped access

You can undo the cap which houses the cables. You only need to do this and not touch the other part below if the cable if in good condition.

There are plastic holding caps which holds the cable ends. The locking knob is adjustable while the other is fixed. This step is only required if you need to adjust the cable length so it slides freely during opening and locking by the motor.



Afterwards, reverse the order to install the lock mechanism.
Remember to test before fitting the housing back.
Remember the power window socket too!

It is about a half hour job :)

Costing:
Left side central locking mechanism $100
Impact (Screw) driver $8.50

Enjoy diy!

Thursday, 5 November 2015

Turn the steering.....Tick Tick Tick.... Why?

I confess I was quite worried it could be a failing steering rack and pinion.
That can be quite expensive.

The sound comes on when turning on the spot, usually during parking or manoeuvring only.

Later I found out it was the bearings inside the mounting bracket.

Plastic bearings.


The plastic bearings collar sits nicely into the bracket mount.

Anyways, to diagnose correctly, try to feel for vibration when turning the steering full lock side to side to isolate the vibration/sound. For my case, it is the right side.

Tip: Its best to have someone to assist when trying to isolate the noise.

As seen, in the top most photo, part of the collar is worn off, probably due to rubbing. This bearing actually rotates with the spring and shock absorbers together. Hence when it is faulty, it rubs against the mounting body, giving the clicky noise.

I wonder.... why is the bearing made of plastic?


The replacement job requires two components:
1. Tool - Coil spring compressors.
2.  Wheel alignment after replacing faulty parts.
 
I decided to let the car mechanic do this job since i don't have the tools to do so.

 This job took 1.5 hrs for both sides to be replaced and renewed.
Coil spring compressors



Tuesday, 3 November 2015

Schnell Ultimate II - What oil is this?

Summary of Schnell Ultimate II oil

This is an old specification oil.
Yes, it is a really affordable.

Here is a summary of my findings

1. This is a rather old specification oil. The current standard is SN while this is usable at SM. Do note that CF-4 for diesel is already obsolete and replaced by CJ-4

2. The European ACEA A3/B3-04 is dated at year 2004

3. Vehicle manufacturers' approval, especially VW 501.01 is only for Volkswagen manufacturing year before 2000.  

4. There is a lack of reputation and tracing as there are
  • No official Schnell website
  • No registration under the American Petroleum Institute (API)
  • The oil was only reviewed in Singapore and not worldwide.
  • Lack of MSDS and specification details 
 
Compared to Shell Helix Ultra (SHU), the rating of SN is more recent although both carries the obsolete CF rating for diesel.

Both oils are meant only for Gasoline and not modern diesels.

You can read the full findings below

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Locally some of us may see this retail in Singapore supermarket


In fact, the price is really attractive for a 4L bottle ever since the drop in oil prices. It was retailing for some $29, and now at $19.90.

Moreover, this is a declared "Proudly Made in Germany"

Can't go wrong with German product.


I was really interested in this since there was so much discussion here in Singapore forums.

As you would know, i am a user of synthetic Shell Helix Ultra 5-w40 for a few years now.

This product seems to be available only in Singapore and no where else.
I found it strange there is no data available, be it official website, product MSDS (material Safety Data Sheet) or some other form of official registration.

On the forums, there was comparison of similar performance for Schnell oil to ShellHU. That got me interested.

Currently the Shell HU 5w-40 is retailing at $38.80 while the Schnell Ultimate II retails for $19.90


Hence, i decided to find out more about this Schnell Ultimate II.
Schnell is "quick" in the german language.


Red Light
It is strange that after extensive searches, there was
  1. No official Schnell website
  2. No registration under the American Petroleum Institute (API)
  3. The oil was only reviewed in Singapore and not worldwide.
  4. Lack of MSDS and specification details



I decided to look at the oil specifications in the label.

There are 3 parts

1. API SM / CF-4
2. ACEA A3/B3-04
3. Vehicle manufacturer approvals and year of approval


Part 1. API-SM / CF-4
SM Introduced on 30 November 2004 Category SM oils are designed to provide improved oxidation resistance, improved deposit protection, better wear protection, and better low-temperature performance over the life of the oil. Some SM oils may also meet the latest ILSAC specification and/or qualify as Energy Conserving. They may be used where API Service Category SJ and SL earlier categories are recommended.

CF-4 Obsolete Service typical of high speed, four-stroke cycle diesel engines. API CF-4 oils exceed the requirements for the API CE category, providing improved control of oil consumption and piston deposits. These oils should be used in place of API CE oils. They are particularly suited for on-highway, heavy-duty truck applications. When combined with the appropriate S category, they can also be used in gasoline and diesel powered personal vehicles i.e., passenger cars, light trucks and vans when recommended by the vehicle or engine manufacturer.

http://www.pqiamerica.com/apiserviceclass.htm



Part 2. European Automobile Manufacturers' Association ACEA A3/B3-04

ACEA A3-04 & B3-04 is established in 2004

Usually written as A3/B3-04, so writing as A3-04 & B3-04 is quite redundant.

More about A3/B3...

A3/B3 Stable, stay-in-grade oil intended for use in high performance gasoline and car + light van diesel engines and/or for extended drain intervals where specified by the engine manufacturer, and/or for year-round use of low viscosity oils , and/or for sever operating conditions as defined by the engine manufacturer.


ACEA is a standard under the European Oil Sequences for Service-fill Oils for Gasoline engines, for Light Duty Diesel engines, for Gasoline & Diesel engines with after treatment devices and for Heavy Duty Diesel engines. These
sequences define the minimum quality level of a product for presentation to ACEA members.


NOMENCLATURE & ACEA PROCESS:
Each set of sequences is designated for consumer use by a 2 part code comprising a letter to define the CLASS (e.g. A), and a number to define the CATEGORY (e.g. A1). 


In addition, for industry use, each sequence has a two-digit number to identify the YEAR of implementation of that severity level (e.g. A1 / B1-04 ).
 

Please note that from this 2004 release, the A and B categories have now been respectively combined. As an example, where previously we would have had separate A1-02 and B1-02 categories, we now have a combined A1/B1-04
category.


The CLASS indicates oil intended for a general type of engine - currently A / B = gasoline and light duty diesel engines




Part 3.  Vehicle manufacturer approvals and year of approval

There stated only three approvals for the use of this oil.





Mercedes-Benz (MB 229.3)
-MB 229.3
For petrol and diesel engines. Minimum quality required ACEA A3 / B3 / B4 and MB 229.1. It can only certify 0/ 5 W-x oils.
http://www.oilspecifications.org/mercedes_mb.php


Volkswagen VW (501.01)
-VW 501.01
Conventional motor oils suitable for some VW engines built before MY 2000. This is an “old” oil specification and is applicable to engines built before model year 2000 (up to August 1999). Oils with an approval made post March 1997 were given an alternative, later VW specification.


Volkswagen VW (505.00)
-VW 505.00
Passenger car diesel engine oil specification, minimum performance level CCMC PD-2. Lists viscosities SAE 5W-50, 10W-50/60, 15W-40/50, 20W-40/50 requiring 13% max. evaporation loss and SAE 5W-30/40, 10W-30/40 requiring 15% max. evaporation loss. 
http://www.oilspecifications.org/volkswagen.php



How about Shell Helix Ultra 5w-40?

This retails for $38.95 currently


This is the specification sheet updated as at Mar 24, 2015

It does fulfil a lot more specifications as seen below.
However, the year for ACEA A3/B3, A3/B4 is not given

However, it being SN qualified is silghtly superior to SM rating.

However both carries CF which is obsolete. The current is CJ-4.

Only use SHU for gasoline and their diesel specific products for diesel engines.





ACEA A3/B3, A3/B4
- No year given


BMW Longlife-01 (BMW LL-01)
Special BMW approval for fully synthetic long-life oil. Product meets ACEA A3/B3 and API: SJ/CD EC-II. Usually required for BMWs built after MY 2002. Can also be used where a BMW Longlife-98 oil is recommended.

MB 229.5
MB sheet for energy conserving oils for certain car and van engines. Approved oils must meet ACEA A3, B3 and B4 specification and some additional demands by Daimler Chrysler AG. Oil must be on the approval list. 
MB 226.5   Multigrade engine oils (Specification 226.5)
  • which are distinctly marked with the label indicating the approval of Mercedes-Benz, e.g. “MB-Approval 229.51”. Labels referring e.g. to “MB 229.51” don't have an approval of Mercedes-Benz.
  • Which are listed in the current MB BeVo. Only listed products are tested and approved by Mercedes-Benz.

VW 502.00
Oil for gasoline engines. Successor of VW 501.01 and VW 500.00 specification. Recommended for those which are subject to arduous conditions. It must not be used for any engines with variable service intervals or any which are referred to under other specifications.
VW 505.00
Passenger car diesel engine oil specification, minimum performance level CCMC PD-2. Lists viscosities SAE 5W-50, 10W-50/60, 15W-40/50, 20W-40/50 requiring 13% max. evaporation loss and SAE 5W-30/40, 10W-30/40 requiring 15% max. evaporation loss.
Porsche A40
(Click to see service bulletin.)
It mainly says A40 is a viscosity 40 weighted oil. That's all.


Renault RN0700
Renault engine oil specification; introduced in 2007 upon introduction of the Laguna III. General requirements: ACEA A3/B4 or ACEA A5/B5.
 
Renault RN0710
Renault engine oil specification; introduced in 2007 upon introduction of the Laguna III. General requirements: ACEA A3/B4 + additional Renault demands.

PSA B71 2296
Peugeot/Citro├źn engine oil specification introduced in 2009. General specifications: ACEA A3/B4 + additional PSA tests.


Ferrari
Fiat 9.55535.Z2 & Fiat 9.55535-GH2 (Meets the requirements of)
Chrysler MS 10725, where MS is Material Standards
Chrysler MS 12991
-Data unavailable











Thursday, 24 September 2015

Exceeded 750 km on one tank

The challenge to better the One Tank 750 km mileage was first conceived on May 7, 2015.

You can read more here at my initial attempt.
http://eco-hondacar.blogspot.sg/2015/05/pacing-to-750-km-on-1-tank_7.html

============================================
Vehicle setup

Stock setup - Honda Stream RN6 - Compact MPV
Similar engine to some Honda Civic: R18A - 1.8 L Auto
Motor Oil:  Shell Helix 5w-40
Fuel: Caltex 92
Tire: Goodyear Triple Max, Pressure between 32 to 36 PSI
============================================

Finally on Sep 24, 2015, I succeeded with 753 km.

What is more impressive was the low fuel lamp lit up at 732.8 km compared to the previous tank at 642.2 km.

The tire pressure at end was 227 kPa (32.9 Psi) and it was not maintained at my usual 245 kPa (36 Psi) for some time.

http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/stream/2008/ecohonda/336534

Left: Receipt Sep 14, 2015  /  Right: Receipt Sep 24, 2015

Here is a series of dashboard shots of distance vs fuel level






Finally the 750 km mark





Here is the 14.1 kpl average on 8,768.7 km accumulated so far.

This is a comparison to the similar engine type sedan (Honda Civic 1.8)

The difference is the body profile and weight.

Kerb weight Civic (Sedan) vs Stream (Compact MPV)
2600 lbs (1179 kg) vs 3020 lbs (1370 kg)

Not bad for a compact MPV to be driven efficiently to be placed in the same 14 kpl range as the sedan cousins.

You can find articles of my ride at eco-hondacar.blogspot.sg

Monday, 14 September 2015

2nd Tank

Here are the second set of results of the fuel usage after cleaning the Air-Fuel sensor.
The first tank yielded 671 km on 51 ltr of fuel. 

============================================
Vehicle setup

Stock setup - Honda Stream RN6 - Compact MPV
Similar engine to some Honda Civic: R18A - 1.8 L Auto
Motor Oil:  Shell Helix 5w-40
Fuel: Caltex 92
Tire: Goodyear Triple Max, Pressure between 32 to 36 PSI
============================================

On this second tank, the car yielded 683.5 km on 48.086 ltr of fuel.

To compare more accurately, the data from the Low Fuel Lamp will be used as the total distance can be stretched till the tank is really empty.

On 1st tank, the LFL litted up at 646.7 km
Today's tank, the LFL litted up at 642.4 km

Hence i can say that the consumption has been quite constant for these 2 tanks after cleaning the Air-Fuel sensor, which gave the engine better fuel economy.




My previous results 


This is the photo of the 2 sensors. On the left is the post Catalytic convertor Oxygen sensor.
On the right is the pre-cat Air-Fuel sensor.

As you can see, the Oxygen sensor face is rather clean since it is far away from the exhaust manifolds and sees little additive contamination when compared to the Air-Fuel sensor.

Condition of Oxygen sensor & Air Fuel sensor at end of 2nd tank
This is all made possible by the very cheap and sturdy sensor socket i ordered from Ebay.
US$5 China made 1/2 inch sensor socket. Very solid construction. Price includes postage. Cool!

Monday, 31 August 2015

Trouble shooting Code P0172.. my EGR nut is loose

Just today my car threw a P0172 code

============================================
Vehicle setup

Stock setup - Honda Stream RN6 - Compact MPV
Similar engine to some Honda Civic: R18A - 1.8 L Auto
Motor Oil:  Shell Helix 5w-40
Fuel: Caltex 92
Tire: Goodyear Triple Max, Pressure between 32 to 36 PSI
============================================

"System too rich (Bank 1)"
System Too Rich (Bank 1)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
System Too Rich (Bank 1)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
System Too Rich (Bank 1)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
System Too Rich (Bank 1)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172
Copyright OBD-Codes.com
System Too Rich (Bank 1)

Read more at: http://www.obd-codes.com/p0172
Copyright OBD-Codes.com

It happened once a few months back.
I was mimicking the continental cars which had the engine switched off by the vehicle computer while it waited at the red lights. It automatically turned on again when the driver removes his feet from the brake pedal.

I think i flooded the system with fuel doing that. It threw a check engine lamp after a few repeatition of doing that on my vehicle.

Basically I erased the code via the OBD2 reader and the check engine lamp (CEL) went away.


Today is different.

The car had a jerk when the gear changed from 1st to 2nd.
I thought... its a transmission problem...oh no!

Then while i turned into my parking area, the engine switched itself off and the check engine lamp lit up on my dash.

I decided to drive on by restarting again and again.

It was quite worrying because the symptom would manifest only when the car stopped at red lights idling, but as soon as i am on the expressway, it didn't give me much trouble. I was worried because if the car switched itself off, i would loose the power steering and brakes. Thankfully the car pushed on.

I made it back to my workshop and did the troubleshooting immediately.

Its always good to have an OBD2 scanner handy to really know what happened.
Possible causes
a- Faulty front heated oxygen sensor
b- Ignition misfiring
c- Faulty fuel injectors
d- Exhaust gas leaks
e- Incorrect fuel pressure
f- Faulty Mass Air Flow (MAF) sensor

When is the code detected?
- Fuel injection system does not operate properly.
- The amount of mixture ratio compensation is too large. (The mixture ratio is too rich.)

Possible symptoms
- Engine Light ON (or Service Engine Soon Warning Light)
- Excessive Fuel Consumption


Right now i am unable to remove the oxygen sensors  without tool. Yep, still waiting for it to arrive.


What I did
1. Cleaned the MAF sensor (item f)

2. Removed the fuel rail to check if it is leaky (item c).
I turned the key on several times without starting to prime the fuel pump and build the pressure up in the lines. The injectors did not leak.


No leaky fuel injectors

3. Inspect the spark plugs. Yes there is a bit of soot seen.



4. Check the EGR valve (item d)
I decided to check the EGR. I found the nuts slack. That could be the reason.

The 2 nuts on the EGR valve was slack

Well, i made my own gasket the last time. The material collapse from the heat which explained why the nuts securing it were slack. I made a new gasket and installed the EGR valve back again. This time i secured the nuts tight.


Road test
I took the car out again.
No problems this time.
I am glad it wasn't the injectors nor oxygen sensor.
They are costly items to replace!

After a long drive later, I took my spanner and tighten it again just to be safe.


Side note: It is not that the gasket is bad. It had a layered construction.
Perhaps i did not torque it enough the previous time.

Milam Mica PSS 150

This Klinger PSS150 is not al-cheapo material.
Milam laminates are suitable for use in hot, dry gas applications such as exhaust manifolds, turbines, turbo chargers and air heat exchangers.




Friday, 28 August 2015

Results after Air Fuel sensor cleaning

Results from cleaning Air-Fuel sensor

Update 29/Aug/2015: Final mileage 14 kpl vs 12 kpl

============================================
Vehicle setup

Stock setup - Honda Stream RN6 - Compact MPV
Similar engine to some Honda Civic: R18A - 1.8 L Auto
Motor Oil:  Shell Helix 5w-40
Fuel: Caltex 92
Tire: Goodyear Triple Max, Pressure between 32 to 36 PSI
============================================

In the last post,  the Air-Fuel sensor had white deposits on its probe.

I had them cleaned. The mileage has improved tremendously.

You can find the previous article here:
http://eco-hondacar.blogspot.sg/2015/08/reversing-downward-trend-after-using.html


Expectation from cleaning AF sensor: If the fuel consumption does improve, then i can confidently say that the additive or dislodged deposits did clog up the sensor probe.

No doubt, the Redline Fuel System Cleaner does its job well at cleaning. However the sensor probe residual must be removed to restore the performance after usage of additives, even when label says it is sensor safe.

The reported mileage from the trip computer crept upwards, first from 11 kpl till 13.7 kpl (today).



I still have a bar left of fuel. Surpassing 632.4 km (Jun 29 record) for this tank should be fairly doable.

Hence, clearing the air-fuel sensor did yield positive results

It also meant that additive deposits can be removed from the sensors with success. 

Update


 There, a marked improvement after cleaning the Air-Fuel sensor.









http://www.fuelly.com/car/honda/stream/2008/ecohonda/336534

Now, i wonder if cleaning the oxygen sensor (it is located after the Catalytic converter) will yield significant results.